Editor in Chief Executive Editor

Sarah Blick

Rita Tekippe

Welcome
Welcome to this special issue of Peregrinations, featuring articles on Ottonian art and architecture, guest edited by Evan Gatti of Elon University. In this issue, distinguished scholar Adam Cohen reviews how the field of Ottonian art has developed over the past century and how, in the last decade, it has been transformed from an "area long-ignored by art historians [to one that] is being rediscovered and addressed with vigor and sophistication by both established and emerging scholars." The new spate of research and interpretation focuses on the social and political meanings carried by illuminated manuscripts, textiles, metalwork, and architecture, taking the scholarly discussion into new realms, discovering the multi-layered symbolism displayed before an intelligent and powerful audience. Evan Gatti examines the Warmund Sacramentary, discussing its images in relation to its patron, its geography, and its historiography, concluding that it served as an expression of local episcopal power. Similarly, such power as negotiated between royalty and clergy is reflected in Stephen Wagner's article on the Codex Aureus of Echternach and related works. Decoration includes luxurious imitation of Byzantine textiles used to wrap relics, which were meant to recall a more sanctified past where monastic reform was the rule. Eliza Garrison's essay investigates how the style and usage of two important Gospel Books and a major processional cross created a network of political and religious associations that promoted the rulers' claim to legitimacy by tying them to both the Roman and Carolingian pasts, especially around the celebrations of the Pentecost. Jennifer Kingsley focuses on how one would have interacted with these new, powerful images, using the Gospel Book of Bishop Bernward as an example. Its imagery lent itself to a new style of worship that emphasized the role of understanding the sacred through touch.

Our other featured article is a Photo Essay on the Pilgrimage Site of Walsingham by Matthew Champion. The stunning images and text bring the site to life. We are also in the process of renovating our Photobank. This will take some time, but we hope it will make this feature even more user friendly. This Photobank resource continues to grow with copyright-free images that are all downloadable for use in research and teaching.

This issue also contains Short Notices and Announcements, including new websites devoted to the Plan of the Monastery at St. Gall, the various versions of the Roman de la Rose, and more. In Discoveries the latest medieval archaeological finds are presented.

More links have been added to the Links page, and this issue features the fun site of Historic Tale Construction Cit [sic] or Caption your own Bayeux Tapestry. http://www.adgame-wonderland.de/type/bayeux.php, as well as other sites you might find useful. New Journals (under Publishing Opportunities) welcomes The Journal of Late Antiquity and Kunstgeschichte. Open Peer Reviewed Journal to the scholarly community. We also, as usual, list calls for papers, conferences, research announcements and more.

For future issues we are actively seeking articles on any aspect of medieval art and architecture, including: long and short scholarly articles, scholarly book reviews, review articles on issues facing the field of medieval art history, interesting notes and announcements, useful website recommendations, new archeological discoveries, and recent museum acquisitions as well as calls for papers and conference listings. We are interested in publishing articles that will undergo double-blind review as well as those which are subject only to regular editing process, including articles that are the result of preliminary research. We are also looking for copyright-free images to add to our Photobank, to be shared and used by anyone in the classroom and in their research. To round out the scholarly portion of the journal, we welcome short, amusing excerpts from medieval sources, comments on the Middle Ages in movies and popular culture, etc.

Again, welcome to Peregrinations. Any suggestions or comments you have concerning the journal would be most welcome. Please feel free to e-mail us: Sarah Blick or Rita Tekippe.

Our grateful appreciation and thanks for partial funding provided by Kenyon College. Webmaster: Nirajan Mandal, Todd Skinner

Current Issue: Vol. 3, Issue 1 (2010)

Vol. 2, Issue 3, 4 (2009)

Vol. 2, Issue 2 (2007)

Vol. 2, Issue 1 (2005)

Vol. 1, Issue 4 (2004)

Vol. 1, Issue 3 (2003)

Vol. 1, Issue 2 (July 2002)

Vol. 1, Issue 1 (February 2002)

FABRICATI DIEM, PVNC
-- The motto of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch (Terry Pratchett, Guards! Guards!)